The star of ‘Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.’ has died

Jim Nabors as Private Gomer Pyle in 1965.
Image: CBS via Getty Images

Jim Nabors, whose wide-eyed character Gomer Pyle was so popular on The Andy Griffith Show that he got his own spinoff and whose surprisingly sonorous baritone singing voice made him a successful recording artist, has died. He was 87.

“Golll-ly!” was just one of many corn-pone catchphrases that propelled the hit ’60s show’s naive and lovable Mayberry gas-station attendant to popularity (beating out others like “Garsh!” and “Sha-zam!”).

When CBS decided that Pyle would leave Mayberry for the military, he became Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., where his childlike innocence would constantly rattle his Marine sergeant. The spinoff lasted six seasons.

Nabors died at his home in Hawaii after a period of declining health, his husband Stan Cadwallader told The Associated Press. “Everybody knows he was a wonderful man. And that’s all we can say about him. He’s going to be dearly missed,” Cadwallader told the AP.

Born in Alabama, Nabors had been privately out to his friends and loved ones for years, but it wasn’t until the couple wed in 2013 in Washington State that he came out publicly. They lived together in Hawaii, where Nabors had moved in the1970s.

Though Gomer Pyle’s voice was cartoonishly high and homespun, it belied another of Nabors’ talents: as an operatic baritone. He recorded scores of albums and sold out concert halls, hotel resorts and Vegas showrooms through the years.

But the one music gig he’ll perhaps be best known for: The annual singing of “Back Home Again in Indiana” just before the start of the Indianapolis 500. 

Nabors first tackled the Hoosier anthem in 1972, and did it every year (except one, 2007, which he missed with an illness) until 2014, which he announced would be his last.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/11/30/jim-nabors-obit-dead-dies-back-home-again-indiana/

Jimmy Kimmel slams GOP senator for lying ‘right to my face’ over health care

Once again, Jimmy Kimmel is slamming Republican lawmakers over healthcare. 

This time he’s attacking the Graham-Cassidy bill, proposed by Sens. Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy. Cassidy actually appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in May after the talk show host’s emotional speech about his son’s heart surgery. 

The senator promised that he’d only support a bill that passed the “Jimmy Kimmel test” — meaning that it would guarantee coverage for kids like Kimmel’s son, born with congenital heart disease. 

On Tuesday night, Kimmel said Cassidy “lied right to my face.”

“This bill actually does pass the Jimmy Kimmel test — but a different Jimmy Kimmel test,” he said. “With this one, your child with a preexisting condition will get the care he needs if and only if his father is Jimmy Kimmel. Otherwise, you might be screwed.”

Then he absolutely laid into Graham and Cassidy.

“They’re counting on you to be so overwhelmed with all the information, you just trust them to take care of you,” he said. “But they’re not taking care of you. They’re taking care of the people who are giving them money, like insurance companies.”

“This guy, Bill Cassidy, lied right to my face”

There’s a reason Kimmel is so mad. The new Senate bill allows insurance companies to once again raise rates for people with pre-existing conditions, or even deny them coverage. It would also eliminate Obamacare subsidies and federal funding for Medicaid expansion.

It’s hard to tell how many people would lose their insurance thanks to this bill, because the bipartisan Congressional Budget Office hasn’t scored it yet — and won’t do so until after the Senate the votes on it. 

Kimmel might poke fun at politicians, but he isn’t known as a liberal firebrand. For the most part, he leaves that to Stephen Colbert. But he’s gone through the gut-wrenching experience of waiting out his baby son’s heart surgery.

So many Americans — myself included — have watched friends and family members deal with cancer, heart disease, and other life-threatening conditions. 

Imagining them being denied care or going bankrupt on top of having of that seems beyond cruel. And that’s why it’s so important that even people who don’t seem “political” speak out. 

“Before you post a nasty Facebook post saying I’m politicizing my son’s health problems, I want you to know — I am politicizing my son’s health problems, because I have to,” he said. 

Hopefully, Republican senators were listening. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/19/jimmy-kimmel-bill-cassidy/

9 things you don’t know about Americas unofficial first family, The Simpsons

This calls for a collective Belcher family belch
Image: FOX

Set your grills to medium-high, Bob’s Burgers fans, because the Belcher family’s lovable antics are officially coming to the big screen.

Are your palms as slick with sweat as Tina’s while gazing longingly at Jimmy Jr.’s butt? Well they should be, because the Fox animated show not only boasts an enviable cast of comedians, but also a heart of gold — with arteries as clogged as Teddy’s, presumably. (But they’re clogged with love, so keep shoving those burgers into our hearts!)

On Twitter, creator Loren Bouchard confirmed that the team behind the animated show is developing a feature film set for release in 2020:

Bouchard then immediately got our pulses racing by responding to a fan’s request for the film to focus on “Horseplay” (a reference to a character voiced by comedian Ron Funches, from the show’s legendary “Equestranauts” episode tackling the brony phenomenon). 

“We’re still kicking around titles, but ‘Horseplay, the Horsening’ is definitely in the running,” Bouchard tweeted back

That’s a juicy enough title to sink your teeth into. Bob’s Burgers is known for its Grade A pun and spoof humor — though, to be clear, the actual restaurant still only boasts a barely passing grade from health inspector Hugo. But if episode titles like “Eat, Spray, Linda” and “Zero Larp Thirty” are anything to go on, the team will certainly be serving up some choice meats for the film.

Yet, while Bouchard is committed to writing a film for Bob’s Burgers regulars, he also sees it as an opportunity for a grand re-re-re opening that brings new customers into the family comedy.

“We also know it has to fill every inch of the screen with the colors and the sounds and the ever so slightly greasy texture of the world of Bob’s – but most of all it has to take our characters on an epic adventure. In other words, it has to be the best movie ever made. But no pressure, right?!” Bouchard said in a statement, first reported by Deadline. 

It’s been a big year for Bob’s Burgers. While it may not be the cultural phenomenon that The Simpsons has become, the quirky step-sister of the Fox animated comedy lineup still took home its second Emmy Award for Best Animated Series last month.

We’re hoping the film will take Bob’s Burgers from being a secret menu item and raise it to entree status in the public’s eyes (or, uh, tummies.)

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/04/bobs-burgers-movie-release-date-2020/

Daily Show’s Trevor Noah thinks it’s finally time to talk about guns in America

Image: Dennis Van Tine/Sipa USA

In the wake of a mass shooting that left 59 dead and more than 520 people hurt, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said, “There’s a time and place for a political debate, but now is a time to unite as a country.” 

Well, The Daily Show‘s Trevor Noah thinks that’s BS. On Monday night, he called out politicians and members of the media who claimed right now is not the time to talk about gun control. 

“I feel like people are becoming more accustomed to this kind of news,” he said, noting there have been 20 mass shootings in the two years he’s lived in the United States. 

After the latest shooting — in which a gunman fired at a country music concert from his Las Vegas hotel room — pundits even turned to hotel security as a possible culprit. Instead of, you know, sane gun laws. 

“We seem to do everything to avoid talking about guns,” Noah said. 

The talk show host pointed out that Congress was still considering the Sportsman’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act, which would make it easier to buy silencers and armor-piercing bullets.

“I can only say I’m sorry,” Noah told the people of Las Vegas, “sorry that we live in a world where people would put a gun before your lives.”

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/02/trevor-noah-daily-show-las-vegas-shooting/

Julia Louis-Dreyfus reveals breast cancer diagnosis, calls for universal health care

Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus at the 2017 Emmy Awards earlier this month.
Image: FilmMagic

Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus announced Thursday that she has breast cancer, sharing a heartening post on Twitter that also calls for universal health care.

“1 in 8 women get breast cancer,” her statement begins. “Today, I’m the one.” 

But ever one to use her platform for good, Dreyfus’ statement also called on her followers to demand universal access to health care.

“The good news is that I have the most glorious group of supportive and caring family and friends, and fantastic insurance through my union. The bad news is that not all women are so lucky, so let’s fight all cancers and make universal care a reality.”

Her announcement prompted an outpouring of sadness and love from fans, most notably from fellow actress and breast cancer survivor Christina Applegate, who immediately offered her support.

Her Veep co-star Tony Hale also posted a heartfelt message about the news:

Dreyfus is an 11-time Emmy award winner. She took home her latest, for her role as President Selena Meyer on Veep, earlier this month.

HBO issued the following statement to The Hollywood Reporter:

“Our love and support go out to Julia and her family at this time. We have every confidence she will get through this with her usual tenacity and undaunted spirit, and look forward to her return to health and to HBO for the final season of Veep.

The company also offered support on Twitter.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/28/julia-louis-dreyfus-breast-cancer-statement/

Jimmy Kimmel isn’t done being a thorn in the side of Obamacare repeal bill

When you’re only trying to save health care for 30 million people, you’ve got to be a little persistent.

The man you’d least expect to be on the front foot for saving health care in America, Jimmy Kimmel, is far from resting in his battle to ensure the Graham-Cassidy bill doesn’t cut funding to the most vulnerable. 

Entering into round three of the debate on Thursday night, Kimmel took aim at President Donald Trump, who recently got involved in the debate on Twitter (where else). 

For Kimmel, Trump’s support for the bill is more about politics than it is about a bill that’s, you know, actually good.

“Those are the key words, ‘Repeal and replace.’ Because for Donald Trump this isn’t about the Graham-Cassidy bill. It’s about getting rid of Obamacare, which he hates primarily because Obama’s name is on it,” he explained.

“He likes to have his own name on things: Buildings, vodkas, you name it. And at this point, he would sign anything if it meant getting rid of Obamacare. He’d sign copies of the Quran at the Barnes & Noble in Fallujah, if it meant if he could get rid of Obamacare.”

Also in Kimmel’s sights was Trump’s championing of Senator Bill Cassidy as a “class act,” that he “doesn’t lie” and “just wants to help people.” Kimmel isn’t buying it.

Kimmel pointed out numerous times that he isn’t a health expert, which has been the most common criticism of him in the last few days. He just wants lawmakers and critics to listen to the numerous groups against the bill.

“All of these groups, populated by doctors, say this health care bill is bad. They’re against it. We haven’t seen this many people come forward to speak out against a bill since Cosby,” he said.

While Kimmel’s personal heartbreak is the fuel in his campaign against the current Graham-Cassidy bill, it’s the broken promise of a test in his name that has really vexed the late night TV show host.

“Bill Cassidy named this test after me. I am I supposed to just be quiet about that?” he asked. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/22/jimmy-kimmel-round-three/

Jimmy Kimmel’s baby may save healthcare for 30 million people

Image: randy holmes/ABC via Getty Images

Welcome to 2017, where the American government has ceded its already crumbling moral authority to the former host of The Man Show.

Don’t you miss the 2016 election now?

Still, the last few days have produced some of the best material late night television has ever had to offer, and all it’s because of former Man Show star, Win Ben Stein’s Money co-host, and late night host, Jimmy Kimmel. Kimmel has not only taken on the Senate’s practically homicidal Graham-Cassidy healthcare bill, he’s done it without resorting to lies or distortions (how quaint!). He accomplished this by speaking from a place of deep empathy, and by centering on a character that remains untouchable across the political spectrum: his baby.

Back in May, Kimmel’s newborn son had to undergo an emergency open-heart surgery. It was this hardship that brought America’s perilous healthcare situation into sharp focus for the comedian. And as he’s grown more vocal about the issue, he returns to his own child as the impetus for his outspokenness.

That’s why every counter-attack by GOP politician and pundits against Kimmel has fallen flat on its face: in the symbolic war between sick babies and man-baby Senators, the sick baby will always win.

By positioning his baby at his monologue’s heart and center, he’s created the most sympathetic protagonist imaginable and made anyone who opposes that character a hateful antagonist by extension (which, I mean, is accurate). Everyone who attacks Kimmel’s position, is essentially attacking his baby. 

Not a good position for a politician.

“Before 2014, if you were born with congenital heart disease like my son was, there’s a good chance you would never be able to get health insurance because you had a pre-existing condition,” Kimmel said in May. “If your baby is going to die, and it doesn’t have to, it shouldn’t matter how much money you make … we all agree on that, right? I mean, we do!” 

Babies work. There’s a reason why every politician is required to take a photo with them at some point in their campaign.

When I was a social worker, we talked a lot about “worthy victims” and “unworthy victims.” “Unworthy victims” are people a society has collectively decided are victims because of their own poor choices: the poor, victims of sexual assault, the homeless, welfare recipients, people of color, criminals and undocumented immigrants. “Worthy victims,” by contrast, are folks that society has deemed sufficiently worthy of empathy (and consequently, of charitable donations) including sick children, the elderly and people with *certain* disabilities.

That doesn’t mean that worthy victims are exactly living large in America. Just think of the folks who were cruelly pulled from their wheelchairs by Capitol police while protesting Trumpcare that summer. But it does mean that they, culturally at least, have tremendous worth. I can’t think of a stronger symbolic lead than Kimmel’s son — a sick, wealthy kind with a devastating illness — followed closely by his acerbic father. Is there anything Americans love more than a cynical man, who simultaneously knows his facts and is deeply in touch with his own tenderness?

Of a Fox and Friends host who attacked Kimmel for his monologues, Kimmel had this to say:

“And you know, the reason I’m talking about this is because my son had an open-heart surgery and has to have two more, and because of that, I’ve learned that there are kids with no insurance in the same situation,” Kimmel said. “I don’t get anything out of this, Brian [Kilmeade], you phony little creep. Oh, I’ll pound you when I see you.”

Just look at how these Republican politicians and pundits tiptoed around his attacks, especially as  they relate to Kimmy’s son, and relied on the tired excuse than Kimmel wasn’t smart enough to analyze the bill because’s he’s a late night comedian. 

Remember: these folks voted for a man who recently made up an African country in front of Africans and didn’t realize that Frederick Douglass was dead, so we’re not exactly dealing with “wonks” here. 

All late night comedians have in some ways impacted culture and by extension, politics, but Kimmel might become the first late night politicians to have an immediate, substantive impact on policy. There’s a Jimmy Kimmel test Senator Cassidy once told Congress it has to pass. Kimmel even ended his monologue with a screen full of Senator’s phone numbers, amplifying his personal story and turning it into collective action.

Babies work. There’s a reason why every politician is required to take a photo with them at some point in their campaign. There’s a reason why political ads that include children, like this one of Hillary’s, are far more effective than those that feature rehabilitated criminal — even though both would be endangered by Graham-Cassidy.  Kimmel even admitted that he was “politicizing his baby” for the greater good.  

Doing anything that might directly harm babies is one the last moral lines we have around these broken parts. Let’s see if one man’s 13-minute monologues are powerful enough to keep us from crossing it.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/21/jimmy-kimmel-secret-weapon-baby/

Breaking: Even moms like to stream TV and we’ve got the stats to prove it

Peak TV is how we connect with other people now, so what do you do if you’ve got no time to watch?

Netflix conducted a study with over 1,000 moms in the U.S. about how they find time in their schedules to stream TV how they “sneak” in their streaming and why they do it.

Almost all the women surveyed (97%) agreed that they had more me time before motherhood. The study found that three-quarters of U.S. moms (71%) admit to sneaking in TV me-time to keep up with their favorite shows in surprising ways and places. More of the Netflix research includes:

What are some creative ways that moms “sneak” TV? Glad you asked. There’s the “Bathroom sneak (40%), the Beauty sneak (27%), the Hiding sneak (21%), the Health sneak (15%), and the Carpool sneak (15%).

Some moms take breaks while working from home (22%), sitting in a parking lot (19%), running errands (19%), sitting in the driveway (17%), or even lying about other obligations (12%) (the study says “fibbing” but you know what it is).

Image: netflix/zoho

But why are the nation’s mothers lying to us and daring to take time for themselves? They have their reasons:

  1. Take a break from daily routine (66%) and have some adult-only time (49%)

  2. Feel less stressed (55%) and more refreshed (37%)

  3. Get some peace and quiet (47%) and watch something other than kids TV (46%)

  4. Feel like her old self again (32%)

  5. Be a better parent (19%)

The most sneak-worthy shows, in order, were as follows:

  1. The Walking Dead

  2. Greys Anatomy

  3. Orange is the New Black

  4. Friends

  5. 13 Reasons Why

  6. Scandal

  7. How to Get Away With Murder

  8. Once Upon A Time

  9. Fuller House

  10. Gilmore Girls

Image: netflix/zoho

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/11/netflix-moms-sneak/

Carrie Fisher’s battle with drug addiction continued until her death

Carrie Fisher in 2015.
Image: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for US-IRELAND ALLIANCE

Carrie Fisher continued to struggle with drug use in the days before her death, one of many details to emerge from an autopsy report released Monday that was full of new information but still frustratingly short on conclusions.

The official cause of Fisher’s death on Dec. 27 was ruled “cardiac arrest … accompanied by vomiting and with a history of sleep apnea.” The autopsy report also noted that she had cocaine, heroin and MDMA in her system, but states clearly that investigators could not determine what, if any, impact those substances may have had on her death.

“I would tell you, from my perspective that theres certainly no news that Carrie did drugs,” her brother, Todd Fisher, told The Associated Press on Monday. He noted that some substances were prescriptions for the mental health issues she had spoken openly about for years, adding that cigarettes had probably worsened her heart condition.

“If you want to know what killed her, its all of it,” he said.

Fisher’s daughter, Billie Lourd, gave a statement to People over the weekend, in response to an initial Los Angeles coroner’s press release that mentioned only that drugs were found in Fisher’s system:

My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it. She was purposefully open in all of her work about the social stigmas surrounding these diseases. She talked about the shame that torments people and their families confronted by these diseases. I know my Mom, shed want her death to encourage people to be open about their struggles. Seek help, fight for government funding for mental health programs. Shame and those social stigmas are the enemies of progress to solutions and ultimately a cure. Love you Momby.

Monday’s complete report said it appeared Fisher had used cocaine three days before her flight from London to Los Angeles. It could not be determined when she had used heroin or MDMA, but did state that those drugs are detectable for a shorter period.

After playing Princess Leia three times from 1977 to 1983, much of Fisher’s life and creative output centered on her struggles with addiction. She adapted her 1990 autobiographical book Postcards from the Edge for the bigscreen (with dear friend Meryl Streep playing the lead role), and her one-woman show Wishful Drinking revisited many of those themes.

For her funeral in January, her brother Todd carried her remains in an oversized Prozac-pill shaped capsule which he said was “her favorite thing” a final gesture as a mental-health advocate.

Fisher died Dec. 27 at age 60, less than a week after suffering a heart attack on a flight from London to LAX. The following day her mother, Singin’ in the Rain star and Hollywood royalty Debbie Reynolds was stricken with stroke-like symptoms and died hours later. She was 84.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/19/carrie-fisher-cause-of-death/