Trump Proposes to Cut Medicare and Spend Big on Wall, Defense

President Donald Trump will propose cutting entitlement programs by $1.7 trillion, including Medicare, in a fiscal 2019 budget that seeks billions of dollars to build a border wall, improve veterans’ health care and combat opioid abuse and that is likely to be all but ignored by Congress.

The entitlement cuts over a decade are included in a White House summary of the budget obtained by Bloomberg News. The document says that the budget will propose cutting spending on Medicare, the health program for the elderly and disabled, by $237 billion but doesn’t specify other mandatory programs that would face reductions, a category that also includes Social Security, Medicaid, food stamps, welfare and agricultural subsidies.

The Medicare cut wouldn’t affect the program’s coverage or benefits, according to the document. The budget will also call for annual 2 percent cuts to non-defense domestic spending beginning “after 2019.’

At a time when the prospect of rising annual budget shortfalls has spooked financial markets, the White House said in a statement — without explanation — that its plan would cut the federal deficit by $3 trillion over 10 years and reduce debt as a percentage of gross domestic product. Yet, in a break from a longstanding Republican goal, the plan won’t balance the budget in 10 years, according to a person familiar with the proposal.

The budget, to be released later on Monday, is unlikely to gain traction on Capitol Hill. Lawmakers routinely ignore the spending requests required annually from the executive branch. And Congress passed its own spending bill on Friday, including a two-year budget deal, which the president signed into law.

According to the summary, Trump will urge an increase in defense spending to $716 billion and a 2.6 percent pay raise for troops. He will request $18 billion to build a wall on the Mexican border, the summary indicates.

The White House also seeks $200 billion for the infrastructure proposal the administration plans to unveil alongside the fiscal year 2019 budget, as well as new regulatory cuts.

“This will be a big week for Infrastructure,” Trump said in a Twitter message Monday. “After so stupidly spending $7 trillion in the Middle East, it is now time to start investing in OUR Country!”

Monday’s document will outline proposed spending reforms the administration says would, if enacted, cut deficits over the next decade — even as recently passed tax legislation and spending caps threaten to drive future annual deficits above $1 trillion.

Trump May Struggle on $1 Trillion Pledge to Fix Crumbling U.S.

“Just like every American family, the budget makes hard choices: fund what we must, cut where we can, and reduce what we borrow,” Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said in a statement. “It’s with respect for the hard work of the American people that we spend their tax dollars efficiently, effectively, and with accountability.”

A year ago, Trump asked lawmakers to cut $3.6 trillion in federal spending over the next ten years, and identified deep cuts to domestic spending programs. Instead, lawmakers last week passed a two-year government funding deal that would boost military and non-defense spending by $300 billion over the next two years and add more than $80 billion in disaster relief.

But administration officials argue their proposals, dead on arrival though they may be, is still an important marker of the president’s legislative priorities.

Immigration Enforcement

The plan includes a heavy emphasis on immigration enforcement. Trump is requesting $782 million to hire 2,750 new border and immigration officers, and $2.7 billion to detain people in the country illegally. Trump is also asking for $18 billion over the next two fiscal years toward the goal of constructing a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico. That’s a key point of contention in the ongoing legislative battle over the fate of young people, known as “Dreamers,” who were brought to the country illegally as children.

The proposal also includes $13 billion in new funding to combat the opioid epidemic, which Trump has frequently cited as among his top domestic priorities. The administration would provide a $3 billion boost to the Department of Health and Human Services in the next fiscal year, and $10 billion in 2019.

The proposal takes “money that the Democrats want to put to these social programs and move it to things like infrastructure, move it to things like opioid relief, move it to things that are in line with the president’s priorities so that if it does get spent, at least it get spent to the right places,” Mulvaney said Sunday during an appearance on Fox News.

Boost for Veterans

Other elements include $85.5 billion in discretionary funding for veterans health services, education, and vocational rehabilitation, the OMB said on Sunday. It is not clear how much of that funding would represent an increase from current spending levels.

The budget also includes $200 billion in federal funds over the next decade that the White House says would spur $1.5 trillion in infrastructure spending through partnerships with state and local governments and private developers. That includes $21 billion over the next two years that the White House says would “jump start key elements of the infrastructure initiative.”

Trump will discuss the public works proposal on Monday with governors, mayors, state legislators and other officials, and he expects to meet with Congressional leaders from both parties at the White House on Feb. 14. The president plans to visit Orlando, Florida, on Feb. 16 for an infrastructure event, and he and cabinet members will also promote the plan at events around the U.S., officials said.

The White House said its initial approach is to offset the $200 billion in the budget for its infrastructure plan with spending cuts elsewhere, including from some transit and transportation programs the administration doesn’t think have been spent effectively. But Trump is open to new sources of funding, a senior White House official told reporters.

‘Robust’ Defense

The White House also didn’t detail how much money it wanted to devote to new spending on the military, but OMB said the proposal would provide “for a robust and rebuilt national defense.” In last year’s budget proposal, Trump called for a $52.3 billion boost for the Defense Department, while asking for deep cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency, State Department, and Department of Health and Human Services.

Mulvaney said this year’s documents — theoretical though they may be — would see those agencies targeted again for budget cuts.

“There’s still going to be the president’s priorities as we seek to spend the money consistently with our priorities, not with the priorities that were reflected most by the Democrats in Congress,” he told Fox News.

Trump on Friday complained on Twitter that in order to boost military spending, “we were forced to increase spending on things we do not like or want.”

The budget proposal assumes that the U.S. economy will ramp up over the next decade to his goal of 3 percent growth, according to an administration official on Friday who confirmed figures to be contained in Monday’s budget proposal. Economic growth is projected at 3.2 percent in 2019 and 2020.

    Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-12/trump-to-urge-wall-opioid-spending-as-congress-sets-own-course

    Dining at Salt Baes Controversial New Steakhouse

    Almost all the buzz about Nusr-et, set in the former China Grill space in prime Midtown Manhattan, has been negative. The labeled its review “Public Rip-Off No. 1” and noted that after a $521.45 dinner for three, critic Steve Cuozzo still wanted a snack. referenced mundane, rather tough steak, terrible cocktails, and $9 bottles of water because the restaurant declines requests for tap.

    The restaurant is home to Turkish butcher sensation Nusret Gökçe, known as Salt Bae. He has close to 11 million Instagram followers, famous friends such as DJ Khaled (Khaled Mohamed Khaled), and a panoramic way of seasoning steaks that is the most notable culinary meme since Emeril Lagasse said “Bam!” One re-posted YouTube video of his signature move—a crane pose-like sprinkle of salt on a finished steak—has racked up over 4 million views.

    Although it’s my job as food editor at Bloomberg Pursuits to seek out good food, I can’t resist a train wreck of a restaurant.

    Salt Bae is omnipresent at his steakhouse.
    Photographer: Kate Krader/Bloomberg

    In advance of my visit to Nusr-et, the signs for that kind of meal were auspicious. Hours before my dinner came news that the restaurant was under investigation by New York’s Health Department: Salt Bae would now have to wear gloves when salting meat. My dinner guest was Robert Sietsema, senior critic for Eater.com and one of the early visitors to Salt Bae. (His less-harsh-than-most review took the position that a meal there is performance art as much as a steakhouse spread. Spoiler alert: I agree.)

    Dinner preview.
    Photographer: Kate Krader/Bloomberg

    The first thing you see when you walk into the restaurant is a circular bar surrounded by red velvet ropes and staffed by bartenders in leather aprons; you could be at a nightclub. Above is a monster cartoon image of the chef sprinkling salt into the air. On the cocktail list is a #Saltbae Old Fashioned, made with ginger syrup and Scotch, instead of bourbon—quite good, if pricey at $21. Yet its actual cost is $26.64: The restaurant adds an 18 percent service charge, but you wouldn’t know that without asking since it doesn’t deliver itemized bills, and what you’re asked to sign has a very visible gratuity line.

    Meat sushi gets torched.​​​
    Photographer: Robert Sietsema

    Almost immediately upon sitting down, expect to make the acquaintance of the guy wheeling the “meat sushi” cart. Unless you’re good at saying no, you will find yourself watching a meat sushi performance that comprises wrapping thinly sliced raw tenderloin around some undercooked, under-seasoned rice, brushing the top with teriyaki glaze, and incinerating it with a blow torch for a good 30 seconds. It’s an early occasion for guests to whip out cell phone cameras (and maybe a warning to tie back any long hair.) 

    That’s nothing compared to the effect when the chef makes an appearance in his signature look: fitted, v-necked, white T-shirt with slicked coiff. It’s as if Rihanna strolled in. Initially, there’s no salt sprinkling. Salt Bae simply works the room, shaking hands. Robert and I begin to worry: Would the Health Department threat end the seasoning show? Could a high-styled handshake be Salt Bae’s new meme?

    It turns out that a lot has changed in the week since Robert first visited. Tap water was initially not available. Now it is, though you have to ask, and it’s poured from a Voss water bottle so other tables don’t get the wrong idea. Burgers were initially served naked, with no accompaniments; now a pile of cold, shoestring fries snuggles next to the halved burger.

    Most important, the chefs have stopped overcooking the meat. Initial reports were that, no matter what you asked for, the beef arrived brown and medium. Now a medium-rare rib-eye is actually rare in the middle, as is the burger.

    The $100 rib-eye.
    Photographer: Kate Krader/Bloomberg

    One thing that hasn’t changed is the upsell.

    Once it becomes apparent that fries would be served with our burger, we cancel our $15 order for them. The server recommends mashed potatoes instead (also $15). Then our salmon arrives on a bed of mashed potatoes. We end up with spinach—actually quite good, just out of the pan and nicely creamy—and asparagus, which is raw, unpeeled and not good at all. The salmon disappoints, unless you’re fond of the thin, fishy strips that are optional add-ons for a Caesar salad at a mall. (FYI, it’s one of the only non-beef options; the menu features no chicken.)

    Salt Bae’s $30 burger.
    Photographer: Robert Sietsema

    Like everyone else, we’re there for the meat and the show that comes with it. The majority of the beef is wagyu, on display at a wrap-around butcher case in the middle of the dining room. The waiters will tell you about the quality of the New Zealand beef, how it ranks 8!—9!—on the Wagyu scale; no two servers pitch the same story.

    Still, our $100 rib-eye, though a little puny looking, had a great chew and caramelized char. (You can’t choose the weight of any of the steaks, but some cuts have options for the number of people they’re supposed to serve.) The $30 burger actually seems like a deal; the two-inch patty is very coarsely ground, so it’s part steak and supremely meaty. These are among the cheaper items on the menu. There’s also saslik (Turkish spice-marinated tenderloin cubes) for $70, a rack of lamb for $250, and most significant, the Saltbae tomahawk marinated in mustard, all yours for $275. 

    Gloves are no longer optional.
    Photographer: Robert Sietsema

    You want to hate the place, to dismiss it. There are better, less-expensive, steaks just a few blocks away, dry-aged and funkier than what you’ll find at Nusr-et.

    Yet, when Salt Bae shows up to slice and season our steak, it’s embarrassingly thrilling, like watching your favorite cheesy movie. He poses for infinite pictures. Apart from a few short exchanges, he’s a silent presence. He doesn’t seem like a guy who owns the place; he’s more like a performer who expertly works the room, giving nothing of himself away. There’s not a moment that the crowd—a 50/50 mix of business men and women in jackets and tourists in branded sports apparel—isn’t hoisting a camera phone in his direction.

    As we’re settling our $286.74 check, a family of four with a teenage son sits down next to us; they all get burgers. , we think, Then a tomahawk arrives at their table. Time passes, with no sign of Salt Bae. The family waits, phones in hand.

    “They need a Salt Bae double,” murmurs Robert. Then, he appears, a last-minute Santa Claus of steak, pulling on a fresh pair of black gloves. Salt Bae squats and begins slicing dramatically, running his knife through the meat to cut out the bone, all positioned so the kid can take a video selfie. The meat gets an additional flourish of salt. The cameras don’t stop flashing.

      Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-01/salt-bae-nusr-et-review-new-york-s-most-controversial-steakhouse

      India’s farmed chickens dosed with world’s strongest antibiotics, study finds

      Warning over wider global health impacts after findings reveal hundreds of tonnes of colistin the antibiotic of last resort are being shipped to Indias farms

      India’s farmed chickens dosed with world’s strongest antibiotics, study finds

      Warning over wider global health impacts after findings reveal hundreds of tonnes of colistin the antibiotic of last resort are being shipped to Indias farms

      Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/feb/01/indias-farmed-chickens-dosed-with-worlds-strongest-antibiotics-study-finds

      Guy Doesnt Eat For A Week, And Heres What Happened

      Fasting seems to have slowly worked itself back into our collective consciences again, this time for health reasons. While humans have fasted for millennia, either involuntarily or for cultural and religious reasons, the advent of diets that incorporate intermittent fasting such as the 5:2 diet or the ‘warrior’ diet has popularized semi starvation in the western world once again.

      Never tried a fast? Let us introduce you to Shen Comix, who also goes under the name of Owl Turd. In his own words he decided to embark on this project because: “The first week of 2018, I decided I wasn’t going to eat anything, because, I dunno, that’s just what I decided for the first week of 2018.”

      This isn’t one of those fancy pants, Gweneth Paltrow style detox fasting programs that are oh so fashionable amongst the alternative health crowd. This is straight up, 7 days, no food. Simple as you like.

      Scroll down to check out Shen Comix’s hilariously emotional fasting journey, as he goes from temptation, to pain and euphoria. Makes you hungry just looking at it!

      Have you been on a fast before? Feel free to share your experiences in the comments!

      Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/week-fasting-experience-comic-shencomix-owlturd/

      Starbucks Christmas Tree Frappuccino just tastes like sugar and regret

      Please drive this away from me.
      Image: STARBUCKS

      Nothing says Christmas like a cold cup of sugar. 

      At least that’s what I kept telling myself as I took a sip, and another one of the Christmas Tree Frappuccino. It’s Starbucks’ latest concoction that has people running out to corporate coffee shops, where they spend $5 and most likely take a bunch of smartphone photos to later post on social media. 

      Like this: 

      Like any good business reporter, I jumped on the trend Sunday. After my editor shared a piece by The Denver Post reviewing the drink and some tweets of people’s reactions, I asked if I could go get one and try it myself. Because that, my friends, is reporting. 

      Well, I’ve been wanting to get one ever since my sister shared the Starbucks ad in our family group Thursday morning. 

      Three hours later, my mom shared a picture of hers. Her review: “It is delicious.” Her favorite part was the candied cranberry topping. 

      Image: screenshot

      Image: screenshot

      I had participated in two of the previous limited-edition Starbucks drinks. 

      The Unicorn Frappuccino, a trend debut, was actually not too bad in my biased opinion. Though I think I was on an emotional high because I drank them with Chloe the Mini Frenchie (RIP). 

      important coffee meeting with @kerrymflynn who you would share a unicorn frappuccino with? 🦄☕️

      A post shared by Chloe The Mini Frenchie (@chloetheminifrenchie) on

      The Zombie Frappuccino was strange, but I was also in the middle of emceeing an event in Columbus, Ohio. 

      I definitely couldn’t let this one escape me. 

      And so that’s how I ended up drinking 420 calories on a Sunday morning. Fortunately, I live four blocks from a Starbucks, so it wasn’t too burdensome to put on a jacket and walk out in the cold weather for a frozen beverage. 

      The most embarrassing part was probably ordering when I asked for a “Christmas Tree Frappuccino” and the barista replied, “What?” So then I had to repeat myself over a cringeworthy order while the person in front of me just sipped her cup of hot coffee. 

      I waited to take a sip until I could take photos. Because, of course, that’s exactly what Starbucks wants us all to do. All of our tweets are free ads. Actually, they’re not just free. We’re not getting paid. We’re paying them. Starbucks is making money having us all make ads for them. It’s brilliant, and I’m happy to be part of it. 

      I got home and looked at the drink on my counter. The Matcha whipped cream had melted to half its height from before. I finally noticed that there was no candied cranberry topping. But I regretfully took a sip. And oh man, it was not good.

      Thin Mints are great (Disclosure: I’m a Girl Scout). Mint Chocolate Chip ice cream is awesome. 

      The Starbucks Christmas Tree Frappuccino is not either of those things. Every sip of this beverage is an overload of sugar. I’d rather crush up a bunch of Thin Mints and mix them with some ice and milk in a blender than continue sipping this. 

      I’m not going to tell you not to get a Christmas Tree Frappuccino because you can probably make your own decisions. But this is not good and you can spend $5 on something else. If you need the picture, go to Starbucks and just wait for someone else to order one. But be good to yourself, and don’t drink it. 

      Please. 

      Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/12/10/starbucks-christmas-tree-frappuccino-review-sugar-regrets-photos/

      Recipes for an all-potato Thanksgiving dinner

      Mashed potatoes: The true best Thanksgiving food.
      Image: Shutterstock / zkruger

      If turkey is the attractive-but-boring star of the rom-com that is Thanksgiving Dinner, mashed potatoes are the funny best friend everyone low-key likes more than the protagonist. 

      They’re so good! You’d rather hang out with her for 90 minutes than you would a boring slice of turkey.

      Friends, let me tell you: It can be done. An all-mashed potato Thanksgiving dinner can happen for you – just ask the highly creative food bloggers of the internet.

      Turkey: Turkey and Mashed Potato Casserole

      Is there a more American food than casserole? This version from Olivia’s Cuisine tops sauteéd shredded turkey with a thick slather of mashed potatoes.

      Cranberry sauce: Mashed Potato Cakes with Cranberry Chutney

      This recipe from Oh Sweet Basil builds a cheesy, fry-able dough from leftover mashed potatoes, and a sweet chutney topping from leftover cranberry sauce, orange juice, and spices you probably already have on hand.

      Green Beans: Green Bean Mashed Potatoes

      This recipe from Living Chirpy is your basic creamy mashed potatoes recipe with a green veggie twist. Do it for your health.

      Image: Living chirpy

      Bread: Potato Rolls

      You know that old box of potato flakes your mom gave you after cleaning out her kitchen cabinets? This buttery roll recipe from Oh Sweet Basil finally puts those to good use.

      Carrots: Carrot Mashed Potatoes

      In this recipe from Living Chirpy, sweet carrots and creamy mashed potatoes make for an unexpected turkey day side dish.

      Image: Living CHirpy

      Stuffing: Amish Potato Stuffing

      Considering that stuffing is the second-greatest Thanksgiving side dish of all time, this recipe from Brooklyn Farm Girl really speaks to us.

      Dessert: Chocolate Mashed Potato Cake

      This recipe from I Heart Eating manages to squeeze potatoes into an otherwise unassuming chocolate cake recipe. 

      Dessert Part 2: Mashed Potato Truffles

      If you really want to throw your dinner guests a curveball, offer up these truffles from Dessert For Two. Made with leftover mashed potatoes and a ton of chocolate, you can top these unusual treats with whatever you want.

      Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/11/21/all-potato-thanksgiving-dinner-recipes/

      China served Donald Trump a very American Chinese meal

      Image: AFP/Getty Images

      For China’s official state dinner hosting U.S. President Donald Trump, the Asian superpower decided on a Chinese menu that looks…kind of American.

      The Thursday evening affair, hosted by Chinese President Xi Jinping at Beijing’s Great Hall of the People, was a glitzy event, attended by the country’s business leaders.

      Thanks to Xiaomi CEO Lei Jun who was present, and posted the menu on Weibo, we know what they ate.

      Image: lei jun/weibo

      The Menu

      Starter: 

      • Hors d’Oeuvres

      Main:

      • Coconut Flavored Chicken Soup

      • Seafood Chowder

      • Kung Pao Chicken

      • Stewed Beef Steak in Tomato Sauce

      • Braised Vegetables in Premium Broth

      • Grouper Fillets in Hot Chili Oil

      Dessert:

      • Pastries

      • Fruits & Ice Cream

      • Coffee/Tea

      Drink:

      • Red Wine Great Wall 2009, Hebei China

      • White Wine Great Wall 2011, Hebei China

      The official invite

      Image: lei jun/weibo

      The items are, by Chinese standards, unadventurous to say the least. Kung Pao chicken, a stir-fry chicken dish, is technically Chinese — but if last night’s version didn’t come with spicy Sichuan peppers, it’s more likely the Panda Express version, and not traditional.

      Stewed beef steak in tomato sauce is the biggest offender.

      But perhaps stewed beef steak in tomato sauce is the biggest offender. For Trump, who’s been known to like his steaks well-done with ketchup, it probably suited him quite well.

      Citing a Chinese People’s Daily report, the South China Morning Post noted that chefs designing a menu for an official dinner like this one would have taken into account a guest’s “tastes, age and state of health.”

      Perhaps that’s why for lunch with the U.S. leader earlier this week, Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe served up a well-done hamburger at a golf club. Just the way he likes it.

      Donald and Melania Trump arrive for the state dinner.

      Image: AFP/Getty Images

      Dinner was a glitzy affair.

      Image: AFP/Getty Images

      Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/11/10/trump-china-state-banquet/

      Coming Soon to Washington: An Anti-Trump Hotel for Liberals

      The first thing you’ll see when you walk into Eaton Workshop, a hotel opening in late spring 2018 in Washington, is a custom-commissioned video art installation by AJ Schnack, shown on a series of vintage-style television screens. All day long, it’ll broadcast a montage of footage from the presidential elections of 2012 and 2016 that’s built around one pointed question: How did our country get where it is today?

      It’s not a subtle statement, and it’s not meant to be.

      In Trump’s Washington, Eaton is planting a clear flag as a haven for Democrats. It’s the world’s first politically motivated hotel, the flagship for a global brand that’s built around social activism and community engagement. And it comes with a pedigree: As the daughter of Ka Shui Lo, the creator and executive chairman of Hong Kong-based Langham Hospitality Group Ltd., founder Katherine Lo knows a thing or two about luxury hotels and world-class service.

      The Big Idea

      An artist’s rendering of the reception desk of the Eaton.
      Source: Gachot Studios

      Lo firmly believes that hotels ought to be catalysts for good. In a world where we can be conscious consumers—of everything from clothing to food to baby products—she argues there’s a place for conscious hotels, too. This isn’t a revolutionary idea: Already, 1 Hotels has built a small collection of luxury properties entirely around the idea of sustainability, and Shangri-La Hotels & Resorts has made a significant, brand-wide commitment to bolster community programming for disadvantaged children in all of its destinations. It’s one of many five-star brands that have a conscious ethos but choose not to flaunt it.

      Eaton Workshop is different. With a premise that’s built around liberal activism and civic engagement, the brand will weave a liberal philosophy into every aspect of the guest experience, some more obvious than others.

      Among the subtler points is the significance of the company’s name: a nod to the high-end shopping mall of that name in Montreal that captured the fascination of Ka Shui Lo when he fled the Cultural Revolution in China. The mall, says Katherine, was a beacon of freedom to her father—and when she found an archival photo bearing its old motto, “Progress and better living,” the two Eatons became forever intertwined.

      The Washington hotel—which has 209 rooms just north of the National Mall—will be the brand’s flagship, with a second location opening in Hong Kong in 2018 and new constructions set to rise in San Francisco and Seattle no sooner than 2019.

      A Hotel With an Agenda

      The lobby of the Eaton.
      Source: Gachot Studios

      Among the Washington location’s programming signatures will be a sort of TED talk series driven by the liberal agenda, consisting of fireside chats and rooftop lectures that Lo hopes will be free, open to the public, and streamable as Eaton-branded podcasts. Then comes the art program, which—aside from the political statement piece at check-in—will include commissions from at least a half-dozen up-and-coming local artists and a street-facing exhibition window curated in partnership with local museums and institutions. A co-working space will prioritize memberships for progressive startups, activists, and artists, while a wellness program will offer “inner-health-focused treatments” such as Reiki and sound baths, rather than facials and massages. (Some of these features will roll out a few months after the hotel opens.)

      Just as important, partners and staff will be brought on board, both for their skills in the food and beverage worlds and their activist track records. For instance, Lo saw the cocktail director of the famed Columbia Room, Derek Brown, as a perfect fit to be the hotel’s beverage director—not just because he’s won such awards as magazine’s Bartender of the Year but because he “cares deeply about social justice.” To wit, Brown actively champions policies that fight sexual harassment in the bartending industry and acts as chief spirit advisor for the National Archives.  

      Similarly, Lo says that the “amazing life story” of house chef Tim Ma “perfectly expresses our brand ethos.” The Chinese-American culinary up-and-comer was an engineer at the National Security Agency for years before discovering his true passion in food. At Eaton’s to-be-named restaurant, Ma is planning a menu with a heavy focus on vegetables from an on-site garden.

      A guest who does nothing other than check in, sleep atop Eaton’s organic mattresses, and check out will still have a sense of the hotel’s mission, says Lo. “We plan to have new ideas in the minibar—an activist toolkit, for example, that includes sheets with information to help you call your congresspeople. And if we’d been open during this year’s Women’s March, I could have seen us putting poster boards and markers in the rooms!”

      Political statements such as these will be tailored to each property. In Hong Kong, for instance, Lo says she’d like to replace Bibles in the nightstand drawers with copies of the United Nations Declaration for Human Rights.

      A Place for Thought Leaders (but Not All of Them)

      The library at the Eaton
      Source: Gachot Studios

      Lo understands that Eaton Workshop isn’t for everyone. “Self-selection is definitely one of our strategies,” she says about branding and marketing materials that directly appeal to the “woke” crowd. “We wanted to emphasize that it’s a place for people who are thinking outside the box and want to effect a change in the world,” she says.

      Though she repeatedly talks about fostering a culture of diversity and inclusion, Lo also tells Bloomberg that “the goal isn’t to bring together left and right.” Instead, she wants to create “a diversity of fields and backgrounds as well as gender and ethnicity.” In other words, her hotel should represent the antithesis of the Trump hotel that’s just a few blocks away, offering an intellectual playground to those who may feel marginalized by the current administration’s agenda.

      This is partisan politics playing out on the city’s hotel scene; whether that will hurt or help Lo’s bottom line remains to be seen. But if the Trump Hotel is any indication, Lo may be poised for big success. According to the , the president’s hotel brought in $1.97 million in profits during the first four months of the year, despite business projections that had forecast a loss of $2.1 million.

      “It’s Like a Non-Profit but Better”

      Though her goal is to create a successful, scalable business, Eaton Workshop is not built to pad Lo’s pockets. On the contrary, she sees the entire enterprise as a means to a philanthropic end, and hopes to use the hotel profits to fund community arts initiatives in the brand’s respective destinations. 

      Each location will have a radio station, cinema, and music venue so local talent can produce or showcase work in a state-of-the-art space at low—or no—cost. In Washington, the building’s history as a printing venue has inspired Lo to create a writer’s residency, where investigative reporters can be hosted on site for several months while pursuing important stories.

      Artists will be invited to create short films, podcasts, or other types of content under the emblem of Eaton’s in-house multimedia studio; the results will be available for guests to stream on personal devices, and each piece will feature a clear activist message and a call to action.

      “We’re hoping that our hotel revenues will propel our creative projects,” says Lo, who likens the hotel to “a non-profit, but better.” Still, room rates won’t be extravagant; prices in Washington are likely to hover in the upper $200s. Thankfully, for members of both political parties—who are, no doubt, tired of dropping Benjamins for vodka drinks at the Trump International—the price of a martini should be less radical.

        Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-13/coming-soon-to-washington-an-anti-trump-hotel-for-liberals

        FDA clarifies that no, love cannot be an ingredient in your food

        This FDA warning has us broken hearted.
        Image: Shutterstock / Piotr Krzeslak

        Watch out, Nanna — according to the FDA, that chicken soup was definitely not made with “love.” At least, not if you’re selling it for mass consumption.

        The Food and Drug Administration sent a letter to Massachusetts company Nashoba Brook Bakery on Sept. 22, rebuking them for, amongst other things, including “love” on the ingredient list for the company’s granola.

        “Your Nashoba Granola label lists ingredient ‘Love,'” the FDA pointed out in its letter to the bakery. “Ingredients required to be declared on the label or labeling of food must be listed by their common or usual name [21 CFR 101.4(a)(1). ‘Love’ is not a common or usual name of an ingredient, and is considered to be intervening material because it is not part of the common or usual name of the ingredient.”

        Wow, okay, FDA.

        In an interview with Bloomberg, Nashoba Brook Bakery CEO John Gates seemed deflated and befuddled by the FDA’s objections.

        “I really like that we list ‘love’ in the granola,” explained Gates. “People ask us what makes it so good. It’s kind of nice that this artisan bakery can say there’s love in it and it puts a smile on people’s face. Situations like that where the government is telling you you can’t list ‘love’ as an ingredient, because it might be deceptive, just feels so silly.”

        However, in a statement to Mashable, an FDA spokesperson clarified that its primary motive for the letter was to instruct the bakery to remedy health violations, such as “potential allergen contaminations and failure to clean and sanitize its baking equipment and facility properly.”

        “The information about “love” as a listed ingredient was included, but is not among the agency’s top concerns,” the spokesperson said. “And focusing only on that particular violation detracts from the multitude of serious violations reflected in this letter.”

        Zing.

        Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/04/fda-love-bakery-ingredient/

        Move over pumpkin-flavored food, persimmons deserve your attention

        Before the first official day of fall arrived, we were already bombarded with every pumpkin-flavored item in the market. Pumpkin is the favorite that all the other vegetables and fruits hate this time of year. What about the other fall produce trying to make their comeback after the summer’s heat? 

        They need some love too. 

        There’s always a few that try to weave their way into the pumpkin phenomenon (I see you sweet potatoes and apples), but one fruit stands out to me in the long list provided by Fruits and Veggies More Matters

        Image: giphy

        I’ll be honest I’ve never heard of persimmons nor been in front of one until recently. But now, everything has changed.

        For starters, it looks like the lovechild of tomatoes and peaches, but tastes like the divine name it was given. 

        Image: De Agostini/Getty Images

        The Asian fruit can be used in salads, desserts and drinks. According to Greatist, “compared to apples, persimmons can be considered an even healthier option thanks to their fiber, antioxidants, and minerals.” 

        I’m allergic to apples, so I’m already sold on this persimmons idea. 

        I decided to research the holy grail of recipes to find some common persimmons recipes and I was not disappointed.

        Delicious Persimmons Cake

        A post shared by Lily (@littlesweetbaker) on

        You can forget the pumpkin pie. This soft, moist cake will be the staple dessert for fall. 

        Beautiful Persimmons Tarte

        Why have a boring ole’ apple tarte? It’s better to combine two different fruits together and produce the most Instagram-worthy picture ever.

        Spreadable Persimmons Jelly

        A post shared by Rachael Ann (@beautyatthefarm) on

        It’s time to put away the syrup or the blueberry jam and try your hand at a spread to make breakfast sweeter.

        Creative Persimmons and Pomegranate Crepes

        A post shared by Madeline Lu (@lumadeline) on

        Be the talk of Thanksgiving dinner and bring a new dessert to the table. I mean, how many times are you going to have a pie?

        Quench-filled Persimmons Smoothie

        Put down the green juice and try a drink worthy enough to clear your thirst. 

        Despite my small fan club, I’m not the only one praising the underrated fruit. It’s name should be known, posted on billboards and hashtag for the world to see.

        Just imagine persimmons spice lattes or persimmons donuts? What about carving persimmons and leave them on your front porch? The adorable small fruit can scare all the bad costumes away. 

        Move over pumpkins, persimmons are ready to make their name in the world of lattes and candles.  They deserve it, you’ve had your moment to shine long enough. 

        Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/14/persimmons-alternative-to-pumpkins/