Chelsea Clinton understandably can’t take Trump’s crude ‘joke’

What a pair.
Image: Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images

It would be that in an exposé of Vice President Mike Pence, it’s a reported comment from President Donald Trump about his veep’s views that’s putting the president right back in the hot seat.

A new New Yorker story, “The Danger of President Pence,” dug out incredible details about Pence’s history, his rise to the vice presidency, and his relationship to Trump. Toward the end of the lengthy piece, author Jane Mayer reported on what Trump thinks about his political partner. 

“Trump thinks Pence is great,” Bannon told me. But, according to a longtime associate, Trump also likes to “let Pence know who’s boss.” A staff member from Trump’s campaign recalls him mocking Pence’s religiosity. He said that, when people met with Trump after stopping by Pence’s office, Trump would ask them, “Did Mike make you pray?” Two sources also recalled Trump needling Pence about his views on abortion and homosexuality. During a meeting with a legal scholar, Trump belittled Pence’s determination to overturn Roe v. Wade. The legal scholar had said that, if the Supreme Court did so, many states would likely legalize abortion on their own. “You see?” Trump asked Pence. “You’ve wasted all this time and energy on it, and it’s not going to end abortion anyway.” When the conversation turned to gay rights, Trump motioned toward Pence and joked, “Don’t ask that guy—he wants to hang them all!”

The last part about gay rights was picked up as especially cruel, and not at all funny. Chelsea Clinton, who has called out Trump before (and before that), was quick to reprimand the president about having a little basic decency.

Others chimed in to share how upsetting it is to hear the president speak about the gay community in such a violent and flippant manner.

As this is one of countless inappropriate, cruel, and inhuman comments Trump has uttered, the fear is that the revelation isn’t likely to change anything — or even get noticed much beyond today’s tweets. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/16/pence-new-yorker-trump-gay-chelsea-clinton/

Uber offers free rides after deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history

Scenes of panic as Route 91 Harvest country music festival attendees struggle to get away.
Image: David Becker/Getty Images

UPDATED (3:15 p.m. ET) Updated to include additional services offered by Lyft


In the chaotic wake of the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history, Uber and Lyft have altered their prices in Las Vegas so people could exit the chaos without being charged exorbitant fees.

The swift moves come after ride services have been criticized in the past for price gouging in the aftermath of disaster.

According to a statement, Uber waived all fares “around the affected area” on Sunday night and continues to offer free rides for some shooting-related trips.

Our hearts ache for everyone affected by this senseless tragedy. We stand ready to support the victims and the Las Vegas community as they recover from this devastating act.

Shortly after hearing about the incident, we worked to ensure all rides from around the affected area were free of charge. Additionally, we are providing free rides to and from area hospitals, the family reunification center, and United Blood Services donor centers for those who wish to donate blood.  

Lyft announced it had suspended its “Prime Time” surge functionality in Las Vegas

We’re heartbroken. Our thoughts are with the victims and their loved ones. We suspended Prime Time immediately after we understood what was happening. We also communicated to drivers about the developing situation.

In addition to this, Lyft announced later on Monday it was offering free rides of up to $40 with the code “VEGASHOPE” to several blood donation centers, relief centers, and hospitals in Las Vegas. The full list is below.

Blood Donation

Labor Health & Welfare Clinic: 7135 W Sahara Ave #100, Las Vegas, NV 89117

United Blood Services: 6930 W. Charleston Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89117

United Blood Services: 4950 W. Craig Rd., Las Vegas, NV 89310

United Blood Services, Henderson:  601 Whitney Ranch Dr. Bldg. D, Ste 20, Henderson, NV 89014

Hospitals

Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center: 3186 S Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89109

University Medical Center: 1800 W Charleston Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89102

Desert Springs Hospital: 2075 E Flamingo Rd, Las Vegas, NV 89119

Valley Hospital: 620 Shadow Ln, Las Vegas, NV 89106

Relief Centers

UNLV Thomas & Mac Center: 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154

Family Reunification Center: Metro Headquarters, 400 S. MLK BLVD Building B

After Uber was criticized for massive surge pricing in the wake of the June 2017 London and September 2016 New York City terror attacks, they issued refunds to all victims who were affected by surge pricing, attempting to send a strong message that victims should feel comfortable turning to Uber in times of emergency. 

In January, both Uber and Lyft were criticized for high prices after travel ban protests at JFK left travelers stranded without an affordable way to get home, though much of the public’s ire focused on Uber. The high prices inspired the hashtag campaign #DeleteUber.

Both Uber and Lyft have received positive responses on social media for stepping up, while drivers and citizens have offered to drive for free or pay for rides.

President Donald Trump has expressed condolences to shooting victims on Twitter, and called for unity in a speech Monday.

If you want to help shooting victims, Las Vegas hospitals are reportedly in desperate need of blood donations. Here’s how to help.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/02/uber-lyft-las-vegas-shooting/

Chili’s Grill & Bar answered a healthcare question and took us all on an educational journey

Image: Brinker International

Forget Chili’s dinner for two special—the bar and grill just served us a hot fresh plate of healthcare knowledge in just under 140 characters. 

Twitter user Colin Gray (@subtlerbutler) went on a tweetstorm on Wednesday about why people should start asking each other information outside of the internet. 

“There’s this weird thing you can do, where, if you need information from someone, you can ask them instead of the internet,” he wrote. “If you live in the same town, you might be able to see them in person. Who knows! The world is your goddam [sic] oyster.”

In case no one understood his rant, he decided to include Chili’s restaurant as a prime example of someone to ask, because who doesn’t love or trust Chili’s? 

Someone decided to humor Gray and ask him what questions he would ask Chili’s. He responded with a serious question about his medical bills and a role the healthcare system plays in paying for his checkups. 

Chili’s came to the rescue and schooled all of us on the meaning of copays. Who knew a restaurant had so much knowledge on healthcare? No more asking the lady at the front desk what the charges mean.

“If your deductible hasn’t been met, your copay is how much it costs to simply leave your doctor’s office. They can charge way more later,” Chili’s tweeted.

After Gray thanked the restaurant chain for answering his question, it didn’t take long for others to ask Chili’s for some advice and have their lives changed forever.

However, we have to understand the restaurant chain isn’t Wikipedia. Sadly, some answers must remain unsolved. 

Aside from the advice, some people took to Twitter to show the similarities between Chili’s take on healthcare and our local politicians.

Chili’s just took their famous slogan “for great American food…think daily” to a whole new meaning. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/21/chili-restaurant-answers-healthcare-question-twittter/

Model shares photo of her cellulite on Instagram to encourage women to love their bodies

A body-postive model has posted an empowering photo of her cellulite on Instagram in an effort to encourage women to love their bodies. 

Model Sophie Turner posted an image of herself taken from a photo shoot, expressing how it made her feel “angry” to see her cellulite. 

“It was on my mind but why should it? I am more than cellulite, I am more than the belly rolls, and the back fat, and cellulite is normal!!” she wrote. 

Turner wrote that “it’s natural for us ladies” to have cellulite, and “we need to stop seeing it as disgusting or ugly.”

“I’ve had cellulite since I was about 12 which is normal. After living with something for a decade it’s all a part of being me,” she added. 

Love the skin you’re in ❤️😘 #nophotoshop #noretouchingneeded #nofilterneeded

A post shared by S O P H I E T U R N E R 💋 (@sophieeturner) on

But, she says she’s “still learning to love” her cellulite and “not hate it.” 

“It’s a slow road to self love but it’s the best thing you can do for your confidence and mental health,” she continued.

🙌  🙌  🙌

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/29/model-cellulite-instagram/

Woman requests time off for mental health, boss sends the perfect reply

It’s been almost three months since the news that Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington died by suicide, and the tributes and comments about the lead singer are still pouring in. 

Before his death, Bennington, along with two members of the band, filmed an episode of Apple Music’s Carpool Karaoke

That video was finally shared on Thursday with the blessings of Bennington’s family and friends, and is 23 minutes of pure joy with comedian Ken Jeong, a big fan of the band. 

The four men rip through Linkin Park classics, an Outkast song, “screaning” lessons (that’s scream singing), a dance break and more. Because this goes beyond the James Corden segments that started the carpool movement, the group goes on a karaoke bus for even more antics.

Fans of Bennington and the band were thrilled, and emotional, about the new video. 

“Everyone at home watching should all sing along,” Bennington says at the end. 

What are you waiting for?

If you want to talk to someone or are experiencing suicidal thoughts, text the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. For international resources, this list is a good place to start.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/12/chester-bennington-linkin-park-carpool-karaoke-/

Leonard Cohen’s last book, finished ‘days before his death’, due out next year

The Flame collects unpublished poetry, as well as notebook entries and song lyrics, and offers an intimate look inside the life and mind of a singular artist

A book of Leonard Cohens final poems, completed in the months before his death and tackling the flame and how our culture threatened its extinction, according to his manager, will be published next year.

Describing the collection, The Flame, as an enormously powerful final chapter in Cohens storied literary career, publisher Canongate said that the Canadian singer-songwriter had chosen and ordered the poems in the months before his death in November 2016. The overwhelming majority of the book, which will be published next October, will be new material, it added.

Cohen, who died at the age of 82, originally focused his career on poetry, publishing the collections Let Us Compare Mythologies in 1956, The Spice-Box of Earth in 1961, and Flowers for Hitler in 1964. By the late 60s, he was concentrating more on music, releasing his first album, Songs of Leonard Cohen, in 1967.

Cohens manager and trustee of his estate Robert Kory said that pulling The Flame together had been a key ambition for the singer-songwriter at the end of his life. During the final months of his life, Leonard had a singular focus completing this book, taken largely from his unpublished poems and selections from his notebooks. The flame and how our culture threatened its extinction was a central concern, said Kory.

Though in declining health, Leonard died unexpectedly. Those of us who had the rare privilege of spending time with him during this period recognised that the flame burned bright within him to the very end. This book, finished only days before his death, reveals to all the intensity of his inner fire.

In an interview with the New Yorker last October, Cohen spoke of how my natural thrust is to finish things that Ive begun, and of how he was getting up well before dawn to write.

I dont dare attach myself to a spiritual strategy. I dont dare do that. Ive got some work to do. Take care of business. I am ready to die. I hope its not too uncomfortable. Thats about it for me, he told the magazines editor David Remnick.

In a certain sense, this particular predicament is filled with many fewer distractions than other times in my life and actually enables me to work with a little more concentration and continuity than when I had duties of making a living, being a husband, being a father. Those distractions are radically diminished at this point. The only thing that mitigates against full production is just the condition of my body At a certain point, if you still have your marbles and are not faced with serious financial challenges, you have a chance to put your house in order.

The Flame will also include an extensive selection from Cohens notebooks, which Canongate said he kept in poetic form throughout his life, and which it promised would offer an unprecedentedly intimate look inside the life and mind of a singular artist and thinker. The full lyrics of his final three albums, along with those he wrote for the album Blue Alert by his collaborator Anjani, will also be included, along with prose pieces and Cohens own illustrations.

Canongates Francis Bickmore, who acquired UK and Commonwealth rights, called it a towering final book, hulking with morbid wit and lit up with insight This substantial parting work, from a great artist now gone, will speak to anyone who has been moved by Cohens unique voice.

The Flame will be published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in the US, and McClelland & Stewart in Canada.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/oct/06/leonard-cohens-last-book-finished-days-before-his-death-due-out-next-year-the-flame

Take a ‘cell-fie’ using your phone and this small microscope adapter

Capitol Police remove a demonstrator in a wheelchair from the Graham-Cassidy hearing.
Image: chip somodevilla/Getty Images

How do we say this nicely, Senator Cassidy and Senator Graham: everyone hates your dumb healthcare bill. 

Well, at least a solid majority of Americans do, and pretty much everyone who came to watch the Graham-Cassidy hearing Monday afternoon. Activists from the grassroots disability rights group ADAPT disrupted the hearing multiple times, causing Senator Hatch to briefly recess the hearing and prompting Capitol Police to arrest protestors, some of them in wheelchairs.

Their protest centered around the large concern that passage of the bill would severely deplete medicaid funding. But many other worries exist about how the bill would not include essential health benefits, cause millions to lose their insurance, and shrink the Obamacare protections for people with preexisting conditions.

The footage of police forcibly removing the ADAPT protesters is both inspiring and predictably heartbreaking.

Here is Senator Hatch ordering that the hearing be recessed as protestors in wheelchairs are pulled away by authorities:

And Senator Cassidy responding with his characteristic charisma, aka a zombie-like yawn:

Under Graham-Cassidy, at least 1.4 million adults with disabilities would lose Medicaid, per the Center for American Progress. Depending on how deep the cuts go (and what version of the bill we’re looking at) that number could easily climb to 1.8 million. 

A protestors looks on as other demonstrators are taken out.

Image: tom williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

With fewer services, advocates fear that folks with disabilities could be forced back into institutions and otherwise pushed out of the workforce.

Organizers estimated that the number of arrests today would hover around 100.

Capitol Police arrest a demonstrator for reportedly disrupting the hearing.

Image: chip somodevilla/Getty Images

ADAPT has a long history of disruptive protest in defense of people with disabilities. The group’s grassroots efforts have been instrumental in bringing attention to issues across America for the past 40 years. 

Capitol police drag a blind protestor out of the hearing.

Image: chip somodevilla/Getty Images

This isn’t the first time Capitol Police have thrown activists with disabilities out of a hearing. In June, 43 demonstrators assembled by the organization were arrested outside of McConnell’s office to protest cuts to Medicaid

Senators McCain, Paul, Collins, and Murkowski have all expressed either opposition or extreme reservations about the bill, which was supposed to be scheduled for a vote sometime this week.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/25/protestors-disabilities-graham-cassidy/

What Alec Baldwin got right and wrong about the power of art at the Emmys.

Alec Baldwin is getting a lot of press following the jabs he took at President Donald Trump in his acceptance speech for Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series at this year’s Emmys.

During Trump’s time hosting “The Apprentice,” he was nominated for two Emmys but never won. Trump has often detailed his grievances with the award show, saying, “The Emmys have no credibility“; arguing that he didn’t win because of politics; and, in 2012, even blaming the show’s “bad ratings” on the fact that he wasn’t nominated that year. But Trump’s inability to lose graciously is not what we need to talk about right now.

In the closing moments of Baldwin’s speech, he kinda missed the mark on something vitally important.

Baldwin wrapped his speech with a message of hope about the power of art, but in doing so, downplayed something else (emphasis added):

“I always remember what someone told me — that is when you die you don’t remember a bill that Congress passed or a decision the Supreme Court made or an address made by the president. You remember a song. You remember a line from a movie. You remember a play. You remember a book. A painting. A poem. What we do is important. And for all of you out there in motion pictures and television, don’t stop doing what you are doing. The audience is counting on you.”

Baldwin accepts the award for his portrayal of Trump. Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

The power of art is a nice sentiment, especially at an award show celebrating just that, but downplaying the significance of legislation and court decisions is a luxury many cannot afford.

While Baldwin may be right — a poem or TV show may stick in our brains more than a piece of legislation — it’s pieces of legislation that truly have an effect on our lives and can alter everything from our quality of living to how long we live. A Supreme Court decision may one day determine once and for all whether or not it’s legal to deny me housing, employment, health care, or access to public accommodations protections simply because I’m transgender. Legislation being proposed in Congress could gut access to health care for low-income individuals who rely on Medicaid or any number of other social programs.

Recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals protections may be pulled away from the only home they’ve known if legislation doesn’t soon grant them a more permanent status in America. Some members of Congress are moving to turn the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into a shell of what it once was, making the world a lot less accessible to millions of people. As Robyn Powell of Rewire wrote of the proposed ADA changes, “Never in my life as a disabled woman have I been so terrified of losing my civil rights as I am now.”

Even the songs, movies, plays, books, paintings, and poems Baldwin championed in his speech are at risk of losing funding, depending on what moves the government makes when it comes to budgeting.

Government legislation matters, and good legislation affects our lives in ways that aren’t always apparent.

For instance, during a July debate between conservative commentator Tomi Lahren and comedian Chelsea Handler, Lahren unwittingly admitted that she benefits from the Affordable Care Act.

Asked whether or not she had health insurance, Lahren replied, “Luckily, I am 24, so I am still on my parents’.” That’s thanks to a provision in the ACA that allows people to stay on their parents’ plans until they’re 26. Millions of people benefit from that change, and it’s such a commonsense, helpful bit of legislation that it’s easy to forget things haven’t always been this way. It’s not something we should take for granted.

Baldwin speaks at January’s “We Stand United” rally outside Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York. Photo by Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images.

It’s not as though Baldwin is aloof here, and he would almost certainly agree that things like court rulings and pieces of legislation can affect us in both positive and negative ways — even some that we might not be immediately aware of. Baldwin, famously, is open about his personal politics. He’s been an outspoken proponent of addressing climate change and even protested Trump’s inauguration. There is no doubt that he understands the power of government — for good and for bad. It’s safe to say that his speech was not meant to downplay those effects.

The truth is, however, that there are people who wonder why everything has to be about politics lately. The answer is simple: Millions of lives hang in the balance. Art is important, but we can’t forget the lives that can be drastically affected by various court decisions and legislation.

Watch Baldwin’s acceptance speech below.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/what-alec-baldwin-got-right-and-wrong-about-the-power-of-art-at-the-emmys

Can music help at-risk students succeed? This woman has set out to prove it can.

In 1997, Margaret Martin had an experience that would change her life forever.

Her 5-year-old son was playing Brahms on the violin at the Hollywood Farmers Market when a group of teenage boys closed in around them.

Her first instinct was fear.

But she quickly realized the young group just wanted to listen to the beautiful piece by the young violinist, and it warmed her heart.

All images via Harmony Project, used with permission.

This sparked her idea for Harmony Project — a program that promotes positive development for at-risk teens through the practice and performance of music.

No stranger to hardship, Martin is a survivor of domestic violence and sexual assault, and she was homeless for a year. She still managed to put herself through college, studying Social Science. By age 43, she received her master’s and doctoral degrees from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

That day at the farmer’s market inspired her to help others access the kinds of educational opportunities she found — no matter their background.

“I view it as a human rights issue because I believed every child that shows up at school deserves a chance at their own complete education,” she says.

During her studies, Martin learned that an impoverished environment, i.e., life in a “poor household or violence-fueled neighborhood,” could potentially alter a child’s brain development and prevent them from learning.

Studies have also shown, for example, that for mothers who have not completed their high school education, the reading and math proficiency of their children was deeply impacted.

Martin was confident that music — especially collaborative music — could help these kids boost their academics.

“We call it mentoring through music,” Martin explains.

Through musical education — specifically, teaching kids to play instruments in group settings — Martin’s program was founded on the belief that music had the potential to positively benefit a child’s academic studies.

A study of Harmony Project kids showed improvement in their brain’s ability to distinguish similar-sounding syllables, which is a skill linked to literacy. The benefits reaped from playing and listening to music occur in the same areas of the brain that are traditionally weaker in children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Therefore, strengthening one area strengthened the others.

In other words, these group music lessons help their brains develop and become more receptive to new knowledge.

By learning the language of music and performing with confidence, the kids involved in Harmony Project can go on to mimic the lessons they learn in music class in their everyday lives, helping them in all their school subjects and improving their grades.

Today, the program is helping over 2,000 students from low-income areas in Los Angeles.

A study of Harmony Project students found that those who were more engaged with the program showed increases in reading scores, while those kids less engaged did not show improvements.

In addition, an overwhelming 93% of Harmony Project seniors have enrolled in college in the past decade.

This is all the data Martin needs to know that her program is making a difference in these kids’ lives.

Many of the kids love the program so much they use their weekend time to make a two-hour round-trip commute on Saturdays.

One former Harmony Project student named Paolo Sayo says that he enrolled in the program in sixth grade as an immigrant from the Philippines. Without Harmony, he and his family didn’t have the resources to continue his violin lessons.

Once he enrolled, not only did he get the lessons, he also got better at music practice, and his grades in other subjects went up too.

“Before I joined, I hated the practicing aspect of violin. I just wanted to get it over with,” Sayo says. “After a while, I started appreciating practicing more. Having that discipline transferred to my school work, where I eventually became an honor student.”

Today, he’s studying to be a health care administrator, but his time with the Harmony Project was so beneficial that he has decided, 10 years later, to remain a mentor for current students.  

The program has a 2-4-year wait list, so Martin is working hard to help expand the program.

Harmony Project is also winning recognition. In 2009, it took home the Coming Up Taller Award at the White House, the nation’s highest honor for an arts-based youth program, from President Obama.

Martin is hoping to use the accolades to help expand the Harmony Project nationwide. Music education and other arts programs have been claiming to boost overall grades for decades, but there’s nothing like a handshake from the President to prove that it’s striking the right note and people are taking notice.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/can-music-help-at-risk-students-succeed-this-woman-has-set-out-to-prove-it-can

John McCain pretty much killed Trumpcare and the bill’s sponsor tweeted a surprising response

Sorry, Lindsey.
Image: Getty Images

The latest trainwreck of a GOP health care plan looks likely to die — and, once again, John McCain could be the dude who killed it. 

On Friday, the Republican senator announced he would vote against the Graham-Cassidy bill. With zero support likely from Democrats, and Republicans Rand Paul and Susan Collins against it, that pretty much dooms the measure. 

One of the men behind the bill — Sen. Lindsey Graham — was likely frustrated. But he still had some kind words for his colleague and longtime friend. 

McCain, Graham, and Joe Lieberman are known as the “three amigos” of the senate. Apparently, that’s a sacred bond that can’t be broken by torpedoing your friend’s terrible health care bill.

Remember, it was McCain who dramatically killed the last GOP effort to repeal Obamacare. His heroics the second time around are being praised by people across the political spectrum. 

The Arizona senator’s decision was met with support from Sen. Bernie Sanders, who has proposed his own “Medicare for all” plan, at a rally in San Francisco.

Jimmy Kimmel was pretty happy too, after absolutely slamming the plan on his show. 

Don’t relax yet, though. It’s possible that before the Sept. 30 deadline, Republicans somehow get the necessary votes for a bill that would — according to the Brookings Institution — cause 21 million people to lose their health insurance every year from 2020 to 2026. 

Thank you McCain and Collins (and I guess Paul, even though he’s not supporting the bill because it’s not draconian enough) for hopefully saving the country from this monstrosity. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/22/john-mccain-tweet-graham-cassidy-healthcare-bill/